How to Supervise

$9.95

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Description

The supervisor is the leader in an organization who is responsible for ensuring his or her team fulfills the mission, upholds the organization’s core values, and achieves the highest standards of performance. He or she must act as a leader, a teacher, and a mentor for the team. This tool addresses the roles of supervisors and managers and offers 22 tips and rules of behavior that will help anyone become a fabulous supervisor. (8 pages)

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How To Supervise

The supervisor is the leader in an organization who is responsible for ensuring his or her team fulfills the mission, upholds the organization’s core values, and achieves the highest standards of performance. He or she must act as a leader, a teacher, and a mentor for the team. This tool addresses the roles of supervisors and managers and offers 22 tips and rules of behavior that will help anyone become a fabulous supervisor.

Show staff the way

Your staff will look to you as their leader. Be one. Your staff’s ability to see the workload ahead and to view the context that gives meaning to their work may be limited by their lack of experience. Help them see how their role and the work they do fit into the larger picture. Guide them. Give your staff specific directions and expectations for performance. Think through what obstacles they might encounter and what assistance they might need. Foster an environment where it is safe and comfortable for them to ask questions and seek clarification. Plan ahead. Get yourself organized. Review the workload that you know will be coming. Think through how you want to handle that workload. Think about who will get what assignments and what dates should be set for deadlines.

Communicate your expectations clearly

Give your staff a standard to achieve. Without it, they will only be guessing at what you expect from them. It is your obligation to make sure they understand what you want, why you want it, and when you want it. These expectations may be yours personally, your manager’s, or the general expectations of the organization as expressed in its “Core Values” or other statements of policy and direction. These expectations could cover the full range of staff’s performance, from how they should conduct themselves in an adversarial situation, to who you want copied on the memo you’ve directed be drafted. Understanding not only what you want, but why, can help them fill in the gaps on how they should proceed if you’re not around to ask.

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